June 23, 2017 RSS feed / Science

Polar bears face more danger

ANCHORAGE, Alaska Rapid global warming has sped up the movement of sea ice off Alaska’s coasts, and already at-risk polar bears are paying a price, a new U.S. study says. More...

Online manners

Google to teach kids safety, etiquette

Google is spearheading an educational campaign to teach pre-teen children how to protect themselves from scams, predators and other trouble.  The program is called “Be Internet Awesome.” Google coordinated the curriculum with several More...

This is us:

Earliest fossils of our species found in Morocco

NEW YORK   How long has our species been around? New fossils from Morocco push the evidence back by about 100,000 years.  More...

Toyota & Technology

Giant Japanese automaker creating ‘flying car,’ luxury boat

TOYOTA, Japan Toyota Motor Corp. is working on a “flying car.” More...

Science says: Weather forecasts are improving, under the radar

WASHINGTON Make fun of the weatherman if you want but modern forecasts have quietly, by degrees, become much better. More...

U.S. reefs on course to disappear within decades

Some of America’s most protected corals have been blighted by bleaching, with scientists warning that U.S. reefs are on course to largely disappear within just a few decades because of global warming.  More...

Plastic Pollution

Company looks to put Illinois center on the textile map

PEORIA, Ill. The mounting problem of plastic pollution in the world’s oceans may be as close as your washing machine. The answer may be as close as the Peoria NEXT Innovation Center. More...

Science says:

What’s known and not known about marijuana

NEW YORK   A new marijuana study joins a limited record of scientific knowledge about the harms and benefits of pot.  More...

Alexa: Take me out to the ballgame and buy me some peanuts

SEATTLE Inside the suites of Safeco Field are the typical, palatial amenities that come with a premium experience at a ballpark: private entries, leather seats, a food spread with numerous culinary options and drinks galore. More...

Is whale of a mystery solved?

WASHINGTON Scientists think they have answered a whale of a mystery: How the ocean creatures got so huge so quickly. A few million years ago, the largest whales, averaged maybe 15 feet long. More...

Technology elevates new theme park experiences in Orlando

ORLANDO, Fla. More...

Toyota, others get behind fuel-cell push

TOKYO Japan is backing a push for pollution free vehicles that run on hydrogen and planning to build more hydrogen fueling stations so that fuel-cell vehicles on roads will grow to 40,000 by 2020, from the current handful. More...

TECHNOLOGY ON HIGH SEAS

U.S. military brings in more equipment to fight drug smuggling

ABOARD THE COAST GUARD CUTTER STRATTON, in the Pacific Ocean The drone is loaded onto a catapult on the flight deck. From a control room, a technician revs the motor until the go-ahead is given to press the red button. More...

Restaurants using technology to nudge us into spending more

NEW YORK Restaurant chains are making it easier to order food with a few taps of the screen — so much so that you may lose sight of how much you’re spending. More...

What’s holding back self-driving cars?

DETROIT   In just a few years, well-mannered self-driving robotaxis will share the roads with reckless, law-breaking human drivers. The prospect is causing migraines for the people developing the robotaxis.  More...

INDIAN RIVER LAGOON

Florida building boom threatens wildlife-rich region

ON THE INDIAN RIVER LAGOON, Fla. The most biologically diverse waterway in America is seriously ill. More...

China to compile its own Wikipedia

Public can’t edit it

BEIJING It’ll be free. It’ll be uniquely Chinese. It’ll be an online encyclopedia to rival Wikipedia — but without the participation of the public. More...

Say goodbye

Americans hang up on landlines as cellphones dominate

NEW YORK   Deborah Braswell, a university administrator in Alabama, is a member of a dwindling group — people with a landline phone at home.  More...

A robot that picks apples?

Replacing humans worries some people despite labor shortage

SPOKANE, Wash. Harvesting Washington state’s vast fruit orchards each year requires thousands of farmworkers, and many of them work illegally in the United States. More...

The battle against invasive species

WASHINGTON   A robot zaps and vacuums up venomous lionfish in Bermuda. A helicopter pelts Guam’s trees with poison-baited dead mice to fight the voracious brown tree snake. More...