2012-01-06 / Ticket

E-MOTION-AL SOUND SCULPTORS

‘Two-man orchestra’ Perpetual e-Motion to play Phippsburg concert
The Times Record


PERPETUAL e-MOTION — Ed Howe, left, and John Cote — will perform Jan. 13 at Phippsburg Congregational Church. The “two-man orchestra” takes recognizable tunes and “charges them into propulsive rhythm.” 
JOSE LEIVA PHOTO PERPETUAL e-MOTION — Ed Howe, left, and John Cote — will perform Jan. 13 at Phippsburg Congregational Church. The “two-man orchestra” takes recognizable tunes and “charges them into propulsive rhythm.” JOSE LEIVA PHOTO PHIPPSBURG

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Maine-based duo Perpetual e-Motion, John Cote and Ed Howe, will perform in concert at the Phippsburg Congregational Church at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13.

“Lauded as a two-man orchestra, Perpetual e-Motion begins with the simple statement of traditional, often recognizable dance and folk tunes from Europe and the Americas and charges them into propulsive rhythm through their use of soundsculpting and playing multiple instruments ranging from the fiddle, guitar and synthesizer to the Australian didgeridoo,” a release announcing the concert states.

“Perched at the convergence of traditional and electronic music, the duo integrates technical and sonic innovations with old school traditions to create a larger-than-life sound drawing from Celtic, bluegrass, jazz and electronic influences,” the release continues. “The end result becomes a driving blend of complex poly-rhythms with melody and countermelody scaffolding exotic and lush chord structures.”

In addition to being popular contradance performers, Perpetual e- Motion has performed in concert at many Maine venues, including Bates College, Colby College, the Common Ground Fair, Sugarloaf, Sunday River and Club Blue in Portland.

The band was featured in a National Public Radio story as being key players on the new contradance scene.

Born into a musical family, Ed Howe started playing fiddle at the age of 4, learning the Suzuki method. His musical interests cover a wide spectrum from bluegrass to Celtic and beyond. He has been a regular instructor for Maine Fiddle Camp since 2003.

Howe has an extensive electronics background and took an interest in the electric violin. He plays a fivestring NS Design electronic violin and is a featured performer on the NS Design artist website.

“Watching him play bare-footed and operating complex equipment with his feet becomes part of the spectacle,” the release states.

John Cote is a well-known accompanist for many Maine and New England fiddlers and is very active as a private teacher and at Maine Fiddle Camp.

Cote attended the Berklee College of Music for a five-week music program in high school and for two years after high school to study film scoring. He later transferred to the University of Maine at Augusta jazz program and earned a bachelor’s degree in jazz performance.

At 22, he took an interest in traditional dance music, teaching himself the mandolin and fiddle. He helped found the band Wake The Neighbors.

Cote plays a Godin acoustic electric guitar connected to a synthesizer module, which adds a wide palette of sounds to the music. Aside from his duties on guitar, Cote simultaneously plays the didgeridoo, an Australian aboriginal instrument, and foot percussion.

Tickets at the door cost $10 for adults or $6 for students. Children younger than 8 years old get in free.

Doors open at 7 p.m. The Phippsburg Congregational Church is located at 10 Church Land off Parker Head Road.

Refreshments will be served at intermission. For more information, call 389-1770.

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